psychology

>Topic:psychology

26 Reasons What You Think is Right is Wrong

Published: Tue, Jul 31, 2007|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , , , |

a cognitive bias is something that our minds commonly do to distort our own view of reality. Here are the 26 most studied and widely accepted cognitive biases. · Go to 26 Reasons What You Think is Right is Wrong →

10 Practical Uses For Psychological Research in Everyday Life

Published: Wed, Jul 25, 2007|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |

· Go to 10 Practical Uses For Psychological Research in Everyday Life →

Moral Sense Test at Harvard

Published: Thu, Jul 12, 2007|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , , |

a Web-based study into the nature of human moral judgment. How do human beings decide what is right and wrong? · Go to Moral Sense Test at Harvard →

Harvard's Visual Cognition Laboratory

Published: Thu, Jul 12, 2007|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |

studies visual attention, visual memory and decision making. Experiments typically take about 5 minutes, but this varies from experiment to experiment. · Go to Harvard’s Visual Cognition Laboratory →

Drew Westen, Emory Department of Psychology

Published: Tue, Jul 10, 2007|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |

Westen’s major areas of research are personality disorders, eating disorders, psychotherapy effectiveness, adolescent psychopathology, political psychology, and the interface of psychodynamics and neuroscience. · Go to Drew Westen, Emory Department of Psychology →

10 Tips to Study Smart and Save Time

Published: Thu, Jul 5, 2007|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , , |

Holistic learning is the process of organizing information into webs that interconnect ideas. Instead of forcing ideas into your skull, focus on the relationships between information. Linking ideas together to see the whole, instead of just the parts. · Go to 10 Tips to Study Smart and Save Time →

Labelling emotions reduces their impact

Published: Fri, Jun 22, 2007|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |

a brain scanning study has found that naming emotions reduces the intensity of emotion processing in the brain, possibly outlining a brain network responsible for the old saying ‘a problem shared is a problem halved’. · Go to Labelling emotions reduces their impact →

Joseph Bulbulia

Published: Tue, May 29, 2007|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |

Professor of Religious Studies at Victoria University, Wellington: uses tools drawn from evolutionary biology and economics to formulate testable hypotheses about the intricate psychological design that underlies our capacity for religion. · Go to Joseph Bulbulia →