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7 06, 2013

What anonymous feedback will (and won’t) tell you

Fri, Jun 7, 2013|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on What anonymous feedback will (and won’t) tell you

From Roger Schwarz: A survey evaluating a team's performance can be a powerful tool for making that team more effective. And the first message that consultants and HR professionals often communicate on these surveys is: "To ensure that the team gets the best data and feels protected, we will make sure responses are confidential." The widespread assumption is that if team members know their answers are confidential, they will respond honestly. But if you ask for confidential feedback, it might create the very results you are trying to avoid. · Go to What anonymous feedback will (and won’t) tell you →

22 04, 2013

The sandwich approach undermines your feedback

Mon, Apr 22, 2013|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on The sandwich approach undermines your feedback

From Roger Schwarz: Have you ever used the "sandwich approach" to give negative feedback to your direct reports? You sandwich the negative feedback between two pieces of positive feedback. It's a common method, but the sandwich approach may be undermining both your feedback and your relationships with your direct reports. · Go to The sandwich approach undermines your feedback →

6 04, 2013

Spotting Keirsey/Myers-Briggs temperaments at a glance

Sat, Apr 6, 2013|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on Spotting Keirsey/Myers-Briggs temperaments at a glance

From Dan Schawbel: There are four basic Keirsey Temperaments — SJ, SP, NT, NF — created by psychologist David Keirsey, who built on the work of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). S stands for sensing, and the S’s are usually “concrete” in their approach. They concern themselves with things they can see, hear, feel, taste, and smell. N is for intuitive, and they focus on things they can imagine or things that could be. J and P refer to judging and perceiving, while T and F refer to thinking and feeling. · Go to Spotting Keirsey/Myers-Briggs temperaments at a glance →

1 04, 2012

Test your creativity: 5 classic creative challenges

Sun, Apr 1, 2012|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Test your creativity: 5 classic creative challenges

From 99%: Five of the most commonly used creativity challenges for your self-testing pleasure. While creativity "testing" is far from an exact science, trying your mettle at these challenges could yield insight into when, where, and how you're most creative. Or maybe it'll just be fun. · Go to Test your creativity: 5 classic creative challenges →

2 03, 2012

Work Group Emotional Intelligence Profile (WEIP)

Fri, Mar 2, 2012|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Work Group Emotional Intelligence Profile (WEIP)

From Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence in Organizations: The Work Group Emotional Intelligence Profile (WEIP) is a self-report measure designed to measure emotional intelligence of individuals in teams. The measure employs a seven-point reference format ranging from 1 (strong disagree) to 7 (strongly agree), with items encouraging reflection on one's own behavior, such as "I am aware of my own feelings when working in a team" and "I am able to describe accurately the way others in the team are feeling." · Go to Work Group Emotional Intelligence Profile (WEIP) →

14 08, 2011

The myth of relationship building as the key measure of PR

Sun, Aug 14, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on The myth of relationship building as the key measure of PR

From Kim Harrison: One of the myths to emerge in public relations in the past ten years has been the view of relationship-building as the key measure of PR accomplishment. The problem with using relationship-building as the key measure is that it is only a process – it doesn’t measure outcomes or results. In the real world, communication professionals are judged by the results they achieve, which are measured in many more important ways than by the relationships they build or strengthen. · Go to The myth of relationship building as the key measure of PR →

28 03, 2011

Why your boss is wrong about you

Mon, Mar 28, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on Why your boss is wrong about you

From Samuel Culbert in NY Times: The performance review makes it nearly impossible to have the kind of trusting relationships in the workplace that make improvement possible. With previews, at least, workers have the opportunity to reverse course and say how they can be their best. Culbert, a professor in the Anderson School of Management at the University of California, Los Angeles, is the author of “Get Rid of the Performance Review! How Companies Can Stop Intimidating, Start Managing — and Focus on What Really Matters.” · Go to Why your boss is wrong about you →

16 11, 2010

Are you a good listener? A self test

Tue, Nov 16, 2010|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Are you a good listener? A self test

From Psychology Today: Can you lend me your ear? Most people believe they are good listeners without considering the important differences between hearing and listening. The ability to hear is typically innate, but the ability to listen well is a skill that must be developed and practiced. Listening means paying attention and making a conscious effort to process what you hear. It is one of our most important skills and it is also one of the most overlooked. We often take our ability to listen for granted, even knowing that it plays a major role in good communication. So are you the type of person who lets information in one ear and out the other, or are you a thoughtful, actively engaged listener? Assess your active listening skills with this test. · Go to Are you a good listener? A self test →

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