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7 01, 2011

The web is a customer service medium

Fri, Jan 7, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , , |Comments Off on The web is a customer service medium

From Paul Ford: One can spend a lot of time defining a medium in terms of how it looks, what it transmits, wavelengths used, typographic choices made, bandwidth available. I like to think about media in terms of questions answered. · Go to The web is a customer service medium →

15 06, 2010

Letters of note: Correspondence deserving of a wider audience

Tue, Jun 15, 2010|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on Letters of note: Correspondence deserving of a wider audience

An attempt to gather and sort fascinating letters, postcards, telegrams, faxes, and memos. Scans/photos where possible. Fakes will be sneered at. Updated every weekday. Edited by Shaun Usher. · Go to Letters of note: Correspondence deserving of a wider audience →

17 12, 2009

Tiger-Stalking: In Defense of Our Tabloid Culture

Thu, Dec 17, 2009|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on Tiger-Stalking: In Defense of Our Tabloid Culture

From Newsweek: “Celebrity” has become a tarnished word, for which we may largely credit the late Daniel Boorstin, the eminent historian who defined it in The Image, his 1961 survey of what he saw as the devolution of America. “The celebrity,” Boorstin proclaimed, “is a person who is known for his well-knownness.” Boorstin was writing at a time of great cultural flux, with the rise of the mass media and an effulgence of what he considered trash, and he placed celebrity within the larger context of an America whose citizens were increasingly enthralled by imitations of reality rather than by reality itself — by the pretense of substance without the actual substance. He coined the term “pseudo-event” to describe counterfeit happenings like press conferences, photo ops, and movie premieres that existed only to advertise themselves. He called celebrities human pseudo-events: hollow façades illuminated by publicity. So it has been ever since. · Go to Tiger-Stalking: In Defense of Our Tabloid Culture →

10 09, 2009

What's Your CQ and Why Should You Care?

Thu, Sep 10, 2009|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on What's Your CQ and Why Should You Care?

From ChangeThis: CQ, or cultural intelligence, is more than just a kitschy catch phrase for cultural competence. It’s a fresh, new approach to leading in our multicultural, globalized world. Cultural intelligence is defined as the capability to function effectively across national, ethnic, and organizational cultures. And research demonstrates a leader’s CQ may easily be the single greatest difference between thriving in the 21st century world and becoming obsolete. · Go to What’s Your CQ and Why Should You Care? →

12 03, 2009

Inside the story

Thu, Mar 12, 2009|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Inside the story

Offering you an opportunity to get “inside the story” of world famous art and culture with expert instructors in their fields. Our programs are detailed explorations into a particular artistic genre or movement aimed at satisfying the curiosity of those who want to develop or enhance their appreciation of the creative mind at work. · Go to Inside the story →

5 09, 2008

Why So Serious? How the classical concert took shape

Fri, Sep 5, 2008|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on Why So Serious? How the classical concert took shape

by Alex Ross in The New Yorker: Most people are aware that classical concert routine — reassuringly dependable or drearily predictable, depending on whom you ask — is of recent origin, and that before 1900 concerts assumed a quite different form. · Go to Why So Serious? How the classical concert took shape →

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