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9 12, 2014

The 5 most common mistakes in design

Tue, Dec 9, 2014|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: |Comments Off on The 5 most common mistakes in design

From medium.com: There’s no learning without mistakes. And I’ve done the following (as well as seen the following done) too many times to count. Luckily, there’s this thing called the “Internet” and this medium called an “article” that lets us point at and talk about these mistakes behind their backs, in the hopes that by bullying them into the spotlight, it’ll be harder for them to slink around, wasting our time and steering us towards no-good solutions. · Go to The 5 most common mistakes in design →

1 04, 2014

Your design team needs a war room. Here’s how to set one up.

Tue, Apr 1, 2014|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on Your design team needs a war room. Here’s how to set one up.

From Fast Company: Want to foster creativity? Skip the foosball table and opt for a war room instead. Google Ventures's Jake Knapp shows you how. Plus: A peek inside Google Ventures's own war room. · Go to Your design team needs a war room. Here’s how to set one up. →

19 03, 2014

Inside the Pixar braintrust

Wed, Mar 19, 2014|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on Inside the Pixar braintrust

From Ed Catmull in Fast Company: A hallmark of a healthy creative culture is that its people feel free to share ideas, opinions, and criticisms. Our decision making is better when we draw on the collective knowledge and unvarnished opinions of the group. Candor is the key to collaborating effectively. Lack of candor leads to dysfunctional environments. So how can a manager ensure that his or her working group, department, or company embraces candor? By putting mechanisms in place that explicitly say it is valuable. One of Pixar's key mechanisms is the Braintrust, which we rely on to push us toward excellence and to root out mediocrity. It is our primary delivery system for straight talk. The Braintrust meets every few months or so to assess each movie we're making. Its premise is simple: Put smart, passionate people in a room together, charge them with identifying and solving problems, and encourage them to be candid. The Braintrust is not foolproof, but when we get it right, the results are phenomenal. · Go to Inside the Pixar braintrust →

10 11, 2013

Teaching design principles to kids: Over the balcony egg drop

Sun, Nov 10, 2013|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: |Comments Off on Teaching design principles to kids: Over the balcony egg drop

From Adaptive Path: How better to learn about design than by chucking a raw egg over a balcony? Besides being a highly exhilarating release (Weeeee! SPLAT!), it also turns out to be a great hands-on way to teach basic design principles to kids. · Go to Teaching design principles to kids: Over the balcony egg drop →

7 05, 2013

How to help a real-life knight achieve his goals

Tue, May 7, 2013|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on How to help a real-life knight achieve his goals

From Will Dayble at Smashing Magazine: This article is about design consultancy. It’s about wrangling that client who uses empty sentences like, “We want a snappy, simple experience,” or, “It should be on brand and should really pop.” It’s about commanding the room and setting a vision before moving on to wireframes and pixels. · Go to How to help a real-life knight achieve his goals →

22 12, 2012

Questions to ask when reviewing a design

Sat, Dec 22, 2012|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on Questions to ask when reviewing a design

From Jason Fried 37signals: I’ve been thinking more about how I review a design – both my own and someone else’s. So over the past couple days I’ve been writing down every question I’ve been asking when I look at a design-in-progress. Some of these I say out loud, some just go through my head, some are in person, others are posted to Basecamp or Campfire. · Go to Questions to ask when reviewing a design →

23 11, 2012

Stop designing pages and start designing flows

Fri, Nov 23, 2012|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on Stop designing pages and start designing flows

From Smashing Magazine: For designers, it’s easy to jump right into the design phase of a website before giving the user experience the consideration it deserves. Too often, we prematurely turn our focus to page design and information architecture, when we should focus on the user flows that need to be supported by our designs. It’s time to make the user flows a bigger priority in our design process. · Go to Stop designing pages and start designing flows →

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