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28 07, 2016

ADHD and the fear of failure

Thu, Jul 28, 2016|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on ADHD and the fear of failure

From ADDitude: Researchers have ignored the emotional component of ADHD because it can't be measured. Yet emotional disruptions are the most impairing aspects of the condition at any age. Powerful insights into rejection-sensitive dysphoria. · Go to ADHD and the fear of failure →

8 11, 2014

This insanely simple rule will help you overcome your biggest challenges

Sat, Nov 8, 2014|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on This insanely simple rule will help you overcome your biggest challenges

From Shane Snow at Contently: I dedicated a chapter of Smartcuts to the science of failure, and the balance that the world’s most successful people and companies manage to achieve between taking important risks and minimizing the odds of catastrophe. One thing that struck me from the academic research on the subject was how we humans tend to explain our successes and failures in ways that allow us to live with ourselves afterward. We distort reality—tell ourselves what we want to hear—and that gets in the way of our progress. · Go to This insanely simple rule will help you overcome your biggest challenges →

9 05, 2013

Beth Comstock and GE: Imagining the future

Thu, May 9, 2013|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on Beth Comstock and GE: Imagining the future

From Knowledge@Wharton: Beth Comstock, a senior vice president and chief marketing officer at General Electric, thinks everyone should embrace change, accept challenges and never fear failure. It is advice that has helped her continue to grow in her career at NBC, CBS and now GE, where, among other things, she convinced the CEO to support a new slogan for the company: "imagination at work." Comstock offered her thoughts during a Wharton Leadership Lecture. · Go to Beth Comstock and GE: Imagining the future →

18 04, 2013

No fail, no fear

Thu, Apr 18, 2013|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on No fail, no fear

From Gary Schwartz at Improv Odyssey: We all approach new things with some trepidation. I’ve been told by new students that they are there in the workshop because Improv terrifies them and they want to face that fear. Bravo to them for their courage, but ‘sheesh!” I tell them that they need not worry. My workshop is not terrifying. In fact it is the opposite. It’s fun.

Fun is the antidote to fear. My goal is to get their mind completely off their fear by making the workshop more fun than fearful. Rather than talking about the value of the work or reassuring them that it’s not all that scary, I start by playing a game right away. Playing reveals that better than any lecture. · Go to No fail, no fear →

18 04, 2013

The transformative failure bow

Thu, Apr 18, 2013|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on The transformative failure bow

From TED words: The Failure Bow (also known as the Circus Bow, Availability Bow, or Transparency Bow) represents one of the greatest resources in an improvisor’s toolkit. Putting it to use transforms the potential downer of a seeming mistake into a celebration of boldness.

The Bow first showed up in the work of Seattle improv pioneers Edward Sampson and Matt Smith in the mid-1980’s.

[1] They noticed that beginning improvisors in particular needed some way to interrupt the natural demons of self-doubt and self-judgment. Usually, we cringe when we hesitate or make mistakes, expecting punishment or pain from the outside. Or, maybe we flinch or roll our eyes hoping that if we proactively apologize for our ineptitude we can deflect critique from others. Of course, that apology only solidifies and calcifies the error, telling those around us that we’re worthy of their judgment. Sampson and Smith suggested that we instead embrace the moment by stepping proudly forward, flinging our arms in the air, and pronouncing a full-throated, goofy-smiled “I failed! Woo hoo!” The move simultaneously takes responsibility—I’m recognizing that I did, in fact, ‘mess up’—and lightens the mood, making more space for creativity. Rather than spiraling downward or inward, I choose to respond with good cheer, celebrating the boldness that led to the failure. I’m learning! I’m growing! Over time, the spirit of the gesture becomes so ingrained that the impulse to cringe almost fades away completely. · Go to The transformative failure bow →

18 04, 2013

Go ahead, take a failure bow

Thu, Apr 18, 2013|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on Go ahead, take a failure bow

From Beth Kanter at Harvard Business Review: Developed by Seattle-based improvisation teacher, Matt Smith, it works like this: Instead of cringing when you make a mistake, you raise your hands in the air, announce, "I failed", grin like a submissive dog, and then move on. The failure bow can be transformative because it alters our physiological response to failure by removing the demons of self-doubt and self-judgment. Without those holding us back, we can be more flexible and improve results and learning. · Go to Go ahead, take a failure bow →

18 04, 2013

Amy Cuddy: Your body language shapes who you are

Thu, Apr 18, 2013|Filed in: Videos|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on Amy Cuddy: Your body language shapes who you are

In a TEDGlobal 2012 talk given in Edinburgh, Scotland, Cuddy outlined her research, offering a “free, low-tech life hack that takes two minutes” as part of “Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are.” Almost everyone will acknowledge the importance of non-verbal, interactive communication. We make big decisions based on such information, and […]

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