interpersonal-communication

Home » interpersonal-communication
30 11, 2011

Improving self-awareness with the Johari Window

Wed, Nov 30, 2011|Filed in: Paul's blog|Topics: , , , , |Comments Off on Improving self-awareness with the Johari Window

The Johari Window describes a fundamental process for improving emotional intelligence. Developed in the 1950s by American psychologists Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham, the model is especially relevant with today's emphasis on improving ‘soft’ skills — behavior, empathy, cooperation, collaboration, inter-group development and interpersonal development.

20 06, 2011

Transforming an ordinary moment into a TouchPoint

Mon, Jun 20, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Transforming an ordinary moment into a TouchPoint

From LeadershipNow: We all have those moments when we are too busy for the people around us. But those moments are the work of leaders. Those are the moments when we can help to move things from what they are to what they could be. Campbell CEO Doug Conant said, “To me, they’re not interruptions. They’re opportunities to touch someone and improve the situation.” TouchPoints describes a new way of thinking about the work of leadership. TouchPoints are those moments in the day when you have the opportunity to touch the lives of other people. Each has the potential to become a high point or a low point in someone’s day. “Each is an opportunity to establish high performance expectations, to infuse the agenda with greater clarity and more energy, and to influence the course of events.” · Go to Transforming an ordinary moment into a TouchPoint →

20 06, 2011

Leading difficult people: Fearful Fred

Mon, Jun 20, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on Leading difficult people: Fearful Fred

From John Maxwell: Someone once said, “90% of the art of living consists in getting along with people you cannot understand.” Haven’t you found that to be true? I know that if everyone were just like me, then relationships would sure be a lot simpler. But people ARE different, in wonderfully complex ways. And there IS an art to living together. If you’re a leader, the differences are amplified, because you have to not only get along but also influence the other person. So it’s especially important for a leader to learn how to handle personalities and attitudes that are different from your own. · Go to Leading difficult people: Fearful Fred →

1 06, 2011

What is my intention for this conversation?

Wed, Jun 1, 2011|Filed in: Exercises, meeting designs & questions, Paul's blog|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on What is my intention for this conversation?

I have a friend who will want to talk and he'll tell me why. Often he's asking for me to just listen while he talks something through out loud. By stating his intention, it makes it easier for me to understand what I'm asked to do and decide if and when I can participate.

1 06, 2011

Interdependent covenant relationship

Wed, Jun 1, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , , |Comments Off on Interdependent covenant relationship

From Bret Simmons: Covenant relationships are forged with purposeful promises. All parties in the covenant are motivated to keep their promises not only because they share passion for a cause, but also because they deeply value and appreciate the interdependent posture of the covenant. When promises are strained, covenant encourages restoration instead of recourse. · Go to Interdependent covenant relationship →

24 05, 2011

Manage yourself first: The key to managing others

Tue, May 24, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Manage yourself first: The key to managing others

From Sam Alibrando: One of my first goals when facilitating a workshop on the topic of “Managing Difficult People” is to dispute the very myth of the “difficult person.” The difficulty with the concept of a difficult person is establishing exactly who the difficult person is. We almost always experience the “other person” as difficult. · Go to Manage yourself first: The key to managing others →

17 05, 2011

I’m a hypocrite and that’s ok

Tue, May 17, 2011|Filed in: Paul's blog|Topics: , , , , |Comments Off on I’m a hypocrite and that’s ok

To say to someone, “you’re a hypocrite” is about the nastiest thing I can say. The taboo of hypocrisy is so dark and foreboding that I refuse to look at my own hypocrisy. Now research on the brain reveals that our inconsistent behavior is a fact of life. If hypocrisy is a natural state, could we all “chill out” about the horrors of being hypocritical?

Load More Posts