leadership-development

Home » leadership-development
13 04, 2015

How to be emotionally intelligent

Mon, Apr 13, 2015|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on How to be emotionally intelligent

From NY Times: What makes a great leader? Knowledge, smarts and vision, to be sure. To that, Daniel Goleman, author of “Leadership: The Power of Emotional Intelligence,” would add the ability to identify and monitor emotions — your own and others’ — and to manage relationships. Qualities associated with such “emotional intelligence” distinguish the best leaders in the corporate world, according to Mr. Goleman, a former New York Times science reporter, a psychologist and co-director of a consortium at Rutgers University to foster research on the role emotional intelligence plays in excellence. He shares his short list of the competencies. · Go to How to be emotionally intelligent →

16 01, 2015

Make your meeting agenda work

Fri, Jan 16, 2015|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Make your meeting agenda work

From Roger Schwarz: If you are like most leadership teams I’ve seen, your meeting agendas are causing confusion instead of creating clarity. Designed well, an agenda is a tool for quickly getting everyone on the same topic, clarifying the purpose, keeping people on track, and identifying when the discussion is complete. Here are tips for developing an effective agenda, regardless of the topics. · Go to Make your meeting agenda work →

26 05, 2014

Your product or service is either relevant or it’s worthless: Three things you need to do to make sure it’s relevant

Mon, May 26, 2014|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on Your product or service is either relevant or it’s worthless: Three things you need to do to make sure it’s relevant

From ChangeThis: Every day, according to best estimates, your customers and the people you would like to be your customers, are bombarded with more than 5,000 messages. There are advertisements—commercials, billboards, pop ups; calls from telemarketers; emails from deposed princes who need your help banking their fortunes; companies promising to enhance this or that; signs on buses and cabs; branding on clothing and in stores… you get the idea.

No wonder it is becoming harder and harder to break through the clutter. In an environment where literally thousands of messages are competing for attention, how do you get people to pay attention to your business, message, or offering?

Simply put: by being relevant. · Go to Your product or service is either relevant or it’s worthless: Three things you need to do to make sure it’s relevant →

26 05, 2014

How your biases make you blind

Mon, May 26, 2014|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , , , |Comments Off on How your biases make you blind

From ChangeThis: We best empathize with people—be they colleagues or customers—that we have some shared experience with. So if a company is homogenous in form, it will only be able to connect with a homogenous swathe of humans outside the organization—you’ll only be able to communicate with people who have the same hand on the elephant as you do. This leads to a lack of understanding of what value the customer wants. That misunderstanding is the seed of disruption, for the gap between the value you think your customers want and the value your customers actually want is precisely the space where a competitor can replace you. · Go to How your biases make you blind →

7 05, 2013

How unilateral control undermines team results and relationships

Tue, May 7, 2013|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on How unilateral control undermines team results and relationships

From Roger Schwarz: If your leadership team isn’t getting the results it needs, the cause may be your (and your team’s) mindset. Mindset is the set of core values and assumptions from which you operate. It is your way of seeing that shapes your thoughts, feelings, and behavior.

The research and my more than thirty years working with leaders and their teams reveal that in even moderately challenging situations virtually all leaders use a mindset that undermines team results—what I call a “unilateral control” mindset. When you use a unilateral control mindset, you try to achieve your goals by controlling the situation. You try to influence others to do what you want them to do while not being influenced by others. When you’re working with people who see things differently from you, the essence of your mindset is simple: I understand the situation, you don’t; I’m right, you’re wrong; I will win. · Go to How unilateral control undermines team results and relationships →

3 04, 2013

Paying attention to how we listen helps us be better leaders

Wed, Apr 3, 2013|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on Paying attention to how we listen helps us be better leaders

From Henna Inam: Awareness of our “filters” (the lenses through which we see the world) reduces the static in the connections we have with others. When we start to see a situation more objectively it allows us to be more emotionally intelligent in the situation, make better decisions, act from greater objectivity, and establish more genuine connections with others. Listening to how you listen is truly a transformational tool. · Go to Paying attention to how we listen helps us be better leaders →

Load More Posts