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8 11, 2016

Learning-style advice: Don’t trust your learning style

Tue, Nov 8, 2016|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Learning-style advice: Don’t trust your learning style

From NY Magazine: The idea of “learning styles” — the idea that everyone has a “best” way of taking in and retaining information — is a pervasive one. A personal example: If you talk at me, I will quickly forget what you tell me. Send me an email or Slack message, though, and I’ll have a much better chance of remembering the details later, even when I’m away from my phone or computer.

Study after study has suggested, however, that learning styles are mostly a myth. Teaching someone to memorize something according to their preferred learning style, for example, does not result in a significant improvement in their ability to recall that information later. Still, much to the annoyance of psychologists like Christian Jarrett — who included learning styles in his 2014 book Great Myths of the Brain (which Science of Us excerpted here) — this idea refuses to die. A new study, summarized by Jarrett on BPS Research Digest today, helps explain why: Even if learning styles are actually nonsense, it sure doesn’t feel that way. · Go to Learning-style advice: Don’t trust your learning style →

20 03, 2014

Do learning styles teach us anything?

Thu, Mar 20, 2014|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Do learning styles teach us anything?

From Duarte: Do you view your audience as an amorphous blob to whom you can relate to by following a formula? Count on some core truths that are universal no matter who your audience is or where their preferences lie: they want to hear stories and they want you to understand what makes them tick before suggesting they try something new. · Go to Do learning styles teach us anything? →

15 08, 2012

Why your marketing doesn’t make sense to everyone

Wed, Aug 15, 2012|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on Why your marketing doesn’t make sense to everyone

From Mind Power Marketing: When you communicate with people, they receive the information using one of five sensory modalities – visual, auditory, kinesthetic, olfactory and gustatory (or in everyday language – pictures, sounds, feelings, smells and tastes). And, in creating an ‘Internal Representation’ inside our mind, we use the same sensory modalities – with the addition of one more – ‘auditory digital’ or self-talk. However, it’s crucial to recognize that individuals experience those senses in different proportions. Some people may pay more attention to their visual experiences, while others may find their feelings (whether internal or external) more important. In communicating with somebody, it’s therefore important that you’re able to relate to all of the senses. · Go to Why your marketing doesn’t make sense to everyone →

29 05, 2012

Writing for visual thinkers: A guide for artists and designers

Tue, May 29, 2012|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on Writing for visual thinkers: A guide for artists and designers

Developed by AIGA, this insightful e-book by Andrea Marks is designed to help people who think in pictures—a segment of learners that by some estimates includes almost 30 percent of the population—gain skills and confidence in their writing abilities. It takes full advantage of its rich media format with a wealth of images and links to articles, books, websites, blogs, wikis, video and audio podcasts. Written with the visual thinker in mind, Marks offers a feast for the eyes—from Leonardo da Vinci’s sketchbooks to video of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road scroll—adding depth and dimension to the written word and encouraging readers to explore their thoughts and ideas in text. Writing for Visual Thinkers approaches the craft of writing from many directions, all with the ultimate goal of unblocking the reader’s verbal potential. Both experimental and pragmatic, Marks’s methods will result in stronger, more verbally confident artists and designers. · Go to Writing for visual thinkers: A guide for artists and designers →

20 03, 2012

Videos to help you rethink education, learning, & school

Tue, Mar 20, 2012|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on Videos to help you rethink education, learning, & school

From Garr Reynolds: While listening carefully to teachers (and to the masters, etc.) is important, the real learning requires lots and lots of doing, not just listening. One does not learn to play the music — or math or science for that matter — only by sitting in a chair and listening. One learns by doing and figuring things out. I do not provide any answers or insights here, but I wanted to point you to several presentations and interviews below concerning education and schooling that I have found particularly relevant and stimulating. I think they are all worth watching. I hope you'll find something worth while in these presentations that you'd like to share with others and keep the discussion concerning education and schooling going. · Go to Videos to help you rethink education, learning, & school →

14 10, 2011

Are you a synthesizer?

Fri, Oct 14, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Are you a synthesizer?

From Mind Mapping Software Blog: As we all struggle to cope with information overload and help lead our organizations into the future, a new type of person is emerging – a rare breed who can cut through the clutter and get to the essence of a challenge or opportunity, and can see it with a remarkable level of clarity. Visual thinking expert David Armano calls them “synthesizers.”

“Shifts in technology and human behavior are creating the need for 'synthesizers' – people who can filter through the ambient noise being generated in fast-moving business environments and distill thinking into clear and actionable insights, ideas and strategies – which ultimately informs creative and innovative problem solving.” · Go to Are you a synthesizer? →

9 06, 2011

Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning Domains

Thu, Jun 9, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning Domains

There is more than one type of learning. A committee of colleges, led by Benjamin Bloom (1956), identified three domains of educational activities: Cognitive: mental skills (Knowledge), Affective: growth in feelings or emotional areas (Attitude), Psychomotor: manual or physical skills (Skills) · Go to Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning Domains →

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