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28 07, 2016

Dr. Sam Alibrando: The 3 Dimensions of Emotions

Thu, Jul 28, 2016|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Dr. Sam Alibrando: The 3 Dimensions of Emotions

A new book from Dr. Sam Alibrando—a clinical psychologist, organizational consultant and speaker. The 3 Dimensions of Emotions is a new way to understand emotional intelligence and find your relational “sweet spot”—the dynamic intersection of power, heart, and mindfulness. · Go to Dr. Sam Alibrando: The 3 Dimensions of Emotions →

5 07, 2016

Julia Galef: Why you think you’re right — even if you’re wrong

Tue, Jul 5, 2016|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Julia Galef: Why you think you’re right — even if you’re wrong

From TED: Perspective is everything, especially when it comes to examining your beliefs. Are you a soldier, prone to defending your viewpoint at all costs — or a scout, spurred by curiosity? Julia Galef examines the motivations behind these two mindsets and how they shape the way we interpret information, interweaved with a compelling history lesson from 19th-century France. When your steadfast opinions are tested, Galef asks: "What do you most yearn for? Do you yearn to defend your own beliefs or do you yearn to see the world as clearly as you possibly can?" · Go to Julia Galef: Why you think you’re right — even if you’re wrong →

5 02, 2014

How to tame your inner enemy

Wed, Feb 5, 2014|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on How to tame your inner enemy

From Big Think: The greatest enemy we face — one that is indeed greater than any external threat — is the uncontrolled mind. This is the wisdom of the Buddhist master Shantideva, author of the 700 AD Sanskrit text Bodhisattvacharyāvatāra, or Guide to the Bodhisattva Way of Life.

What is the uncontrolled mind? It is the mental habit that makes you timid when it comes to dealing with certain difficult situations and also allows oppressive and frustrated feelings to build up inside you. As a result, you might "freak out" or "blow up," becoming your own worst enemy. · Go to How to tame your inner enemy →

10 06, 2013

Culinary mindfulness and windowfarms: 5 ways to increase well-being

Mon, Jun 10, 2013|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on Culinary mindfulness and windowfarms: 5 ways to increase well-being

From FastCompany: As background, culinary mindfulness includes mindful eating along with mindful cooking, shopping, sharing, remembering, and even talking about food. The purpose is to build awareness of increasing well-being in all the food choices one makes, to accrue mental wealth from every aspect of one’s calories. Adapting a model of flourishing developed by positive psychology, most specifically by Seligman in his recent book Flourish, culinary mindfulness looks to 5 routes for developing well-being: positive emotions and pleasures, relationships, play and fun, meaning, and achievement. · Go to Culinary mindfulness and windowfarms: 5 ways to increase well-being →

6 06, 2013

Positive Psychology: Harnessing the power of happiness, mindfulness, and personal strength

Thu, Jun 6, 2013|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on Positive Psychology: Harnessing the power of happiness, mindfulness, and personal strength

Excerpts from Harvard Health Publications: "In 2002, the Corporate Leadership Council compiled a survey of almost 20,000 employees at 34 companies.  Their findings showed a dramatic link between job performance and attention to strengths: when performance reviews emphasized what a person was doing right in the job, it led to a 36% improvement in performance, while emphasizing performance weaknesses led to a 27% decline in performance."

"Certain strengths have been found to be the most closely linked to happiness.  They are gratitude, hope, vitality, curiosity, and love.  These strengths are so important that they're worth cultivating and applying in your daily life, whether or not they come naturally to you…"

"Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), which combines mindfulness practice with cognitive behavioral techniques, has been successfully used to treat depression and anxiety….  In a randomized clinical trial published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, people with recurrent depression who participated in an eight-week group course of MBCT were significantly less likely to become depressed again than people who continued on antidepressants without therapy.  During the study, people in the mindfulness group reported greater physical well-being and enjoyment in daily life, and 75% were able to discontinue their antidepressant medication."

"Aspects of mindfulness meditation tend to be dose-related– the more you do, the more effect it usually has.  Most people find that it takes at least 20 minutes for the mind to begin to settle, so this is a reasonable way to start.  If you're ready for a more serious commitment, Jon Kabat-Zinn recommends 45 minutes of meditation at least six days a week.  But you can get started by practicing the techniques described here for shorter periods."

"Your temperament also influences how you handle choice and how it influences your happiness.  'I never settle for second best.'  Does that sound like you?  Psychologists would call you a maximizer: in your quest for the best deal or product, you need to evaluate all the choices before making a decision.  Other people are satisficers: they have standards for what they want in a given circumstance, but as soon as something meets those standards (which can be high or low) they make the decision.  Judged by measurable criteria, maximizers may make the best choices.  In research at Columbia University and Swarthmore College, students were rated on their tendency toward maximizing or satisficing and were followed for a year as they searched for jobs.  By the criterion of starting salary, maximizers found the best jobs, making 20% more.  However, going through the process they experienced many more negative emotions, and after being hired they were less happy with their jobs than their classmates who looked for the good-enough option.  Who made the best decision: those with the higher salary or those with greater happiness?" · Go to Positive Psychology: Harnessing the power of happiness, mindfulness, and personal strength →

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