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21 02, 2017

Five habits to heal the heart of democracy

Tue, Feb 21, 2017|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on Five habits to heal the heart of democracy

From Parker Palmer at Global Oneness Project: The human heart is the first home of democracy. It is where we embrace our questions. Can we be equitable? Can we be generous? Can we listen with our whole beings, not just our minds, and offer our attention rather than our opinions? And do we have enough resolve in our hearts to act courageously, relentlessly, without giving up—ever—trusting our fellow citizens to join with us in our determined pursuit of a living democracy?
—Terry Tempest Williams

"We the People" called American democracy into being. Today, the future of our democracy is threatened. How can "We the People" call American politics back to health at a time when, in the words of Bill Moyers, "we have fallen under the spell of money, faction, and fear"? One answer is close at hand, within everyone's reach. We must return to the "first home" of democracy, which, as Terry Tempest Williams points out, is found not in a centuries-old document or in a distant city, but in the human heart. · Go to Five habits to heal the heart of democracy →

21 02, 2017

How to handle being bullied as an adult

Tue, Feb 21, 2017|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on How to handle being bullied as an adult

From Lifehacker: You’d think that bullies would disappear after high school, but some people never grow out of being a great big jerk. They may not steal your lunch money anymore, but bullies can still harass you, put you down, and even undermine your work. Here are some tips for understanding and dealing with bullies, no matter how old you are. · Go to How to handle being bullied as an adult →

15 11, 2016

After Donald Trump was elected president, Aaron Sorkin wrote this letter to his daughter

Tue, Nov 15, 2016|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on After Donald Trump was elected president, Aaron Sorkin wrote this letter to his daughter

From Vanity Fair: The Oscar-winning screenwriter of The Social Network and mastermind behind The West Wing reacts to Donald Trump being elected the 45th president of the United States in a moving letter written to his 15-year-old daughter Roxy and her mother Julia Sorkin. · Go to After Donald Trump was elected president, Aaron Sorkin wrote this letter to his daughter →

26 08, 2016

Bryan Stevenson: We need to talk about an injustice

Fri, Aug 26, 2016|Filed in: Videos|Topics: , , |Comments Off on Bryan Stevenson: We need to talk about an injustice

From TED: In an engaging and personal talk — with cameo appearances from his grandmother and Rosa Parks — human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson shares some hard truths about America’s justice system, starting with a massive imbalance along racial lines: a third of the country’s black male population has been incarcerated at some point in their lives. These issues, which […]

28 07, 2016

Dr. Sam Alibrando: The 3 Dimensions of Emotions

Thu, Jul 28, 2016|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Dr. Sam Alibrando: The 3 Dimensions of Emotions

A new book from Dr. Sam Alibrando—a clinical psychologist, organizational consultant and speaker. The 3 Dimensions of Emotions is a new way to understand emotional intelligence and find your relational “sweet spot”—the dynamic intersection of power, heart, and mindfulness. · Go to Dr. Sam Alibrando: The 3 Dimensions of Emotions →

28 07, 2016

The becoming principle

Thu, Jul 28, 2016|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on The becoming principle

As adults—in the workplace and elsewhere—when we’re asked to do something we’ve never done before, when we need to grow beyond our current capabilities, we can tap into what we naturally did as children, and perform our way to who we’re becoming.

For adults, though, play, performance, and pretending can feel anything but natural. We got the message in a myriad of ways as we left toddlerhood: Play is for kids, not for big people. We’re supposed to color inside the lines; know the correct answer; understand how to behave and fit in. And there’s no denying the importance of that learning—obviously we need to learn how to safely cross the street, say our ABCs and wake up an iPad. But this need to get it right eventually takes over. We learn what we need to in school and by the time we get into the job market, the support we got to learn developmentally as children is long gone. As an adult, it is embarrassing to not know. There are repercussions if we don’t get it right. We feel stupid, and we make others feel stupid if they don’t ‘have it together.’ Many (most?) of us get stuck being ‘who we are’—as defined by ourselves and others—whether that’s our personality (and the initials that we’re assigned by the psychological tools that assess it), what kind of job we do or career we can have, if we’re confident or insecure, and more. Without realizing it, we’ve gotten ourselves in a non-developmental box where there’s not much room for new learning, growth, or experimentation.

But it doesn’t have to be that way. · Go to The becoming principle →

28 07, 2016

A new territory of maturity: Updating our stories to enhance our lives

Thu, Jul 28, 2016|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on A new territory of maturity: Updating our stories to enhance our lives

From Change This: In those endless years it took you to grow out of childhood and stand on your own two feet, you learned about the world in doses. Some of what you learned (and thought you understood) has evolved over time with added experience, but some of the discoveries you made and the stories you constructed around them as a child, even as young as three, have stayed the same, child-like and unchanged, no matter how many years have passed.

[…]

That’s living life in the past, seeing the world around you through a child’s eyes in a child’s story. You’ve been walking around in kid’s sneakers and they’re much too small for you. Here’s how to fit yourself out with good pair of hiking boots to go the distance.” · Go to A new territory of maturity: Updating our stories to enhance our lives →

28 07, 2016

ADHD and the fear of failure

Thu, Jul 28, 2016|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on ADHD and the fear of failure

From ADDitude: Researchers have ignored the emotional component of ADHD because it can't be measured. Yet emotional disruptions are the most impairing aspects of the condition at any age. Powerful insights into rejection-sensitive dysphoria. · Go to ADHD and the fear of failure →

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