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6 09, 2013

An absolute chronology for early Egypt using radiocarbon dating and Bayesian statistical modelling

Fri, Sep 6, 2013|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on An absolute chronology for early Egypt using radiocarbon dating and Bayesian statistical modelling

From Royal Society Publishing: The Egyptian state was formed prior to the existence of verifiable historical records. Conventional dates for its formation are based on the relative ordering of artefacts. This approach is no longer considered sufficient for cogent historical analysis. Here, we produce an absolute chronology for Early Egypt by combining radiocarbon and archaeological evidence within a Bayesian paradigm. Our data cover the full trajectory of Egyptian state formation and indicate that the process occurred more rapidly than previously thought. We provide a timeline for the First Dynasty of Egypt of generational-scale resolution that concurs with prevailing archaeological analysis and produce a chronometric date for the foundation of Egypt that distinguishes between historical estimates. · Go to An absolute chronology for early Egypt using radiocarbon dating and Bayesian statistical modelling →

1 03, 2013

How to use Google like Sherlock Holmes

Fri, Mar 1, 2013|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on How to use Google like Sherlock Holmes

From Big Think: How do we optimize our brains in the Age of Connectivity? Do we need to use up valuable space remembering information that we can easily access on a handheld device? Have we already learned to optimize our brains without knowing it? We have indeed, according to a study published in the Journal of Science by a team led by Betsy Sparrow at Columbia.

Sparrow's study demonstrated that people who thought they would have access to Google didn't end up remembering information as well as people who thought they would not have information at their fingertips. So is Google truly making us stupid? Not exactly. The people who anticipated having access to Google remember how to find it. In other words, they used their memory more as a retrieval mechanism than as a big storage dump.  · Go to How to use Google like Sherlock Holmes →

30 09, 2012

The future of 21st century science: Tearing down knowledge silos

Sun, Sep 30, 2012|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on The future of 21st century science: Tearing down knowledge silos

From Big Think: The interdisciplinary approach both to research and learning is starting to gain favor again because people are starting to recognize the dysfunction that is often apparent in large research institutions, but also because the small and nimble research labs are proving they have a method for speeding the pace and reducing the cost of discovery. · Go to The future of 21st century science: Tearing down knowledge silos →

14 03, 2012

The ‘dark side’ of teams, the risks of social comparisons and the transfer of entrepreneurial skills

Wed, Mar 14, 2012|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on The ‘dark side’ of teams, the risks of social comparisons and the transfer of entrepreneurial skills

From Knowledge@Wharton: Does working in teams make people less receptive to outside input? How can social comparisons undermine trust in working relationships? How do the training and technical knowledge entrepreneurs take from previous employers impact the success of their new ventures? Wharton professor Jennifer Mueller and lecturer Julia Minson, and professors Maurice Schweitzer and Evan Rawley, respectively, examine these issues, and what they mean for business, in recent research papers. · Go to The ‘dark side’ of teams, the risks of social comparisons and the transfer of entrepreneurial skills →

14 08, 2011

The myth of relationship building as the key measure of PR

Sun, Aug 14, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on The myth of relationship building as the key measure of PR

From Kim Harrison: One of the myths to emerge in public relations in the past ten years has been the view of relationship-building as the key measure of PR accomplishment. The problem with using relationship-building as the key measure is that it is only a process – it doesn’t measure outcomes or results. In the real world, communication professionals are judged by the results they achieve, which are measured in many more important ways than by the relationships they build or strengthen. · Go to The myth of relationship building as the key measure of PR →

14 08, 2011

How to start rethinking relationship marketing

Sun, Aug 14, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on How to start rethinking relationship marketing

From Susan Abbott: I came across a wonderful paper recently by Dr. Linda Childers Hon at U of Florida and Dr. James E. Grunig at U. of Maryland: Guidelines for Measuring Relationships in Public Relations. Sounds pedestrian, but isn't. · Go to How to start rethinking relationship marketing →

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