self-awareness

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14 10, 2015

Why you lack self-awareness and what to do about it

Wed, Oct 14, 2015|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Why you lack self-awareness and what to do about it

From Fast Company: If we are indeed capable of judging ourselves with some degree of objectivity, then our self-views should align with other people’s views of us, because others are constant observers of what we do.

But as Heidi Halvorson compellingly demonstrates in her new book No One Understands You And What To Do About It, few people see us the way we see ourselves. In fact, there is a clear gap between our self-views and other people’s views on us, and the bigger this gap, the more dysfunctional our relationships with others will tend to be. What is perhaps most striking is that different people see us in pretty similar ways, which means that we, not others, are the outliers. · Go to Why you lack self-awareness and what to do about it →

30 11, 2011

Improving self-awareness with the Johari Window

Wed, Nov 30, 2011|Filed in: Paul's blog|Topics: , , , , |Comments Off on Improving self-awareness with the Johari Window

The Johari Window describes a fundamental process for improving emotional intelligence. Developed in the 1950s by American psychologists Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham, the model is especially relevant with today's emphasis on improving ‘soft’ skills — behavior, empathy, cooperation, collaboration, inter-group development and interpersonal development.

21 11, 2011

The Amish and the case for humility

Mon, Nov 21, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on The Amish and the case for humility

From Erik Wesner at ChangeThis: When they’re not around you or me, the Amish speak a language called Pennsylvania German. Demut is their word for humility. And Demut isn’t just for the Amish. Why does humility matter?

It matters in business. It matters in life. It matters in our relationships.

A humble approach in a relationship helps one recognize the other person’s inherent value and needs. Humility fosters human understanding.

If you’re guided by humility in business, you are less likely to blow up the company by going too big, too quick. Humility checks you when that demon in your brain says “more.” The one you know you should ignore.

And as some find out the hard way, humility can save a heck of a lot of pain. · Go to The Amish and the case for humility →

21 11, 2011

Daniel Kahneman in conversation with Richard Layard

Mon, Nov 21, 2011|Filed in: Videos|Topics: , , , , , |Comments Off on Daniel Kahneman in conversation with Richard Layard

From London School of Economics: Two systems drive the way we think and make choices: System One is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System Two is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. Over many years, Daniel Kahneman has conducted groundbreaking research into this – in his own words – "machinery of the mind". Fast thinking has extraordinary capabilities, but also faults and biases. Intuitive impressions have a pervasive influence on our thoughts and our choices. Only by understanding how the two systems work together, Kahneman shows, can we learn the truth about the role of optimism in opening up a new business, and the importance of luck in a successful corporate strategy, or the difficulties of predicting what will make us happy in the future, and the psychological pitfalls of playing the stock market. Kahneman shows where we can trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choice are made in both our business and personal lives – and how we can guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble. This public conversation between Professor Kahneman and Professor Lord Layard celebrates the publication of Kahneman's new book Thinking, Fast and Slow.

7 11, 2011

Key learnings from Daniel Kahneman: Thinking, fast and slow

Mon, Nov 7, 2011|Filed in: Books, Paul's blog|Topics: , , , , |Comments Off on Key learnings from Daniel Kahneman: Thinking, fast and slow

From a lecture by Daniel Kahneman, presented by Skeptics Society at CalTech, Sunday, November 6, 2011. In Thinking, fast and slow (2011), Kahneman takes us on a groundbreaking tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think. System 1 is fast, intuitive and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative and more logical.

7 11, 2011

The anti-Gladwell: Kahneman’s new way to think about thinking

Mon, Nov 7, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , , |Comments Off on The anti-Gladwell: Kahneman’s new way to think about thinking

From Maria Popova in The Atlantic: Legendary Israeli-American psychologist Daniel Kahneman is one of the most influential thinkers of our time. A Nobel laureate and founding father of modern behavioral economics, his work has shaped how we think about human error, risk, judgement, decision-making, happiness, and more. For the past half-century, he has profoundly impacted the academy and the C-suite, but it wasn't until this month's highly anticipated release of his "intellectual memoir," Thinking, Fast and Slow, that Kahneman's extraordinary contribution to humanity's cerebral growth reached the mainstream — in the best way possible. · Go to The anti-Gladwell: Kahneman’s new way to think about thinking →

6 05, 2011

Leadership is dead: How influence is reviving it

Fri, May 6, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on Leadership is dead: How influence is reviving it

By Jeremie Kubicek: Explains how to become truly influential by overcoming the desire for self-preservation, a tendency that sabotages many leaders today. It’s not that leadership itself is dead, it’s the way in which many choose to lead that is. It’s all about influence. The more you understand it, the better you’ll be able to utilize it and maximize it for success. That’s what this book is about. Teaching you how to expand your influence, be significant and make a greater impact. · Go to Leadership is dead: How influence is reviving it →

6 05, 2011

Three simple steps to chilling out when you are having a negative or overwhelming day

Fri, May 6, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , , , |Comments Off on Three simple steps to chilling out when you are having a negative or overwhelming day

From Positivity Blog: When you are busy it’s very easy to from time to time fall into a couple of negative headspaces – such as victim thinking, feeling overwhelmed or just plain pessimistic – that make life and work more difficult. In this post Henrik Edberg shares how he usually gets himself out of such destructive inner places. · Go to Three simple steps to chilling out when you are having a negative or overwhelming day →

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