team-development

Home » team-development
21 02, 2017

How to design a team to deliver powerful capabilities

Tue, Feb 21, 2017|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on How to design a team to deliver powerful capabilities

From strategy+business: Does the way your company manages its strategy influence the effectiveness of your teams? And does the way you manage teams affect your strategy? We believe the answer to both questions is yes, and in a new research study under way now, we’re testing that hypothesis.

You can see the evidence in companies with strategic coherence. These are companies with a distinctive identity. The few capabilities that make them unique all fit together, supporting a value proposition that few other companies can match. They choose to go in directions only where their capabilities give them a right to win. Great companies need great capabilities. And inside every company that does things exceptionally well are teams of people working across functional boundaries, year after year, doing things together they couldn’t do alone. · Go to How to design a team to deliver powerful capabilities →

16 12, 2016

Your people’s brains need face time

Fri, Dec 16, 2016|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on Your people’s brains need face time

From strategy+business: An interesting phenomenon emerged in an executive education class I regularly teach. Participants from around the U.S., and sometimes the world, come to the Harvard campus for a week, form teams that work on a significant group project remotely for six months, and then return to Harvard for a concluding session where they present what they’ve accomplished. A couple of years back, one of the teams decided to meet in-person about halfway through. They were so enthusiastic about the meeting, and the project they delivered so impressive, that I have related their experience to subsequent cohorts. Now, more and more teams opt for a mid-project, in-person meeting — a day or two of their own time at their own expense. Those projects continue to be among the best. · Go to Your people’s brains need face time →

20 09, 2016

Eight ground rules for great meetings

Tue, Sep 20, 2016|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Eight ground rules for great meetings

If you want your team to be effective, you need meeting ground rules — and you need agreement about how to use them. Many teams that have ground rules don’t regularly use them. But having rules in place that you consistently enforce can significantly improve how your team solves problems and makes decisions.

There are different types of ground rules. Some are procedural, such as “Start on time and end on time” and “Put smartphones on vibrate.” Procedural ground rules are useful but don’t help your team create productive behavior beyond, say, everyone being on time and having their smartphones on vibrate.

Other ground rules are abstract, such as “Treat everyone with respect” and “Be constructive.” These rules focus on a desirable outcome but don’t identify the specific behaviors that are respectful or constructive. As a result, abstract rules create problems if group members have different ideas about how to act respectfully. For some group members, acting respectfully means not raising any concerns about individual members in the group; for other members it may mean the opposite.

Behavioral ground rules are more useful. They describe specific actions that team members should take to act effectively. Examples of behavioral ground rules include “make statements and ask genuine questions” and “explain your reasoning and intent.” · Go to Eight ground rules for great meetings →

4 03, 2016

The “other side” is not dumb

Fri, Mar 4, 2016|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on The “other side” is not dumb

From the Medium: In psychology, the idea that everyone is like us is called the “false-consensus bias.” This bias often manifests itself when we see TV ratings (“Who the hell are all these people that watch NCIS?”) or in politics (“Everyone I know is for stricter gun control! Who are these backwards rubes that disagree?!”) or polls (“Who are these people voting for Ben Carson?”).
Online it means we can be blindsided by the opinions of our friends or, more broadly, America. Over time, this morphs into a subconscious belief that we and our friends are the sane ones and that there’s a crazy “Other Side” that must be laughed at — an Other Side that just doesn’t “get it,” and is clearly not as intelligent as “us.” But this holier-than-thou social media behavior is counterproductive, it’s self-aggrandizement at the cost of actual nuanced discourse and if we want to consider online discourse productive, we need to move past this. · Go to The “other side” is not dumb →

16 09, 2015

Thinking our way out of the darkness

Wed, Sep 16, 2015|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , , |Comments Off on Thinking our way out of the darkness

From Angie McArthur and Dr. Dawna Markova at Change This: The most significant gift our species brings to the world is our capacity to think. The most significant danger our species brings to the world is our inability to think with those who think differently. It is clear that to stay competitive in our global economy, we must learn how to think collaboratively and innovatively. But if you have ever sat through a mind-numbing meeting or tried to influence a colleague’s view on a project or had a recurring argument with a family member or struggled to participate in a community project, you have recognized that most of us actually don’t know how to think well together.

We take for granted that intelligence occurs within our own minds. We don’t realize that it also occurs between us. What keeps us from tapping into that intelligence and communicating effectively is that most of us don’t know how to think with people who think differently than we do. We habitually misread people and therefore miscommunicate with them. · Go to Thinking our way out of the darkness →

19 08, 2015

When to give feedback in a group and when to do it one-on-one

Wed, Aug 19, 2015|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on When to give feedback in a group and when to do it one-on-one

From Roger Schwarz: Giving feedback in the right setting is important. It affects your team’s performance, working relationships and well-being. Here are some guidelines and explanations for when to give feedback in a team setting, and when to offer it one-one one: · Go to When to give feedback in a group and when to do it one-on-one →

23 04, 2015

The best teams act like musicians

Thu, Apr 23, 2015|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on The best teams act like musicians

From 99u: Allison Eck speaks with members of conductor-less chamber groups about how they organize rehearsals, communicate during performances, and deal with conflict. Here’s what groups like A Far Cry and the Kronos Quartet can teach us about the functioning of a healthy, innovative team. · Go to The best teams act like musicians →

21 08, 2014

Generation We: Why “me” doesn’t work for one and everyone and what “we” can do to change it

Thu, Aug 21, 2014|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on Generation We: Why “me” doesn’t work for one and everyone and what “we” can do to change it

From Change This: Why does society tend to work in opposition to we if we is clearly a superior strategy? Why don’t human beings make stronger moves to get past me … ? Because psychologically and historically, me is a durable way to survive and succeed. Politics and business are competitive and capitalistic. Head-to-head, me appears to be the most viable strategy. But perception isn’t reality.

Social science and history expose me as a less steady way to survive, and a fragile way to thrive. And when me leaves work and goes home, stakes can get even higher. Emotions are closer to the surface. Love is deeper. Commitments are stronger. Me collapses entirely as a carryover strategy from boardrooms to living rooms.” · Go to Generation We: Why “me” doesn’t work for one and everyone and what “we” can do to change it →

Load More Posts