theater

Home » theater
21 02, 2017

Poster perfect: The art of James McMullan

Tue, Feb 21, 2017|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on Poster perfect: The art of James McMullan

From NY Times: No other living artist is more closely identified with an American theater company than James McMullan. For 30 years, his painterly posters for Lincoln Center Theater have been turned into collectibles that are more than advertising: They’re synonymous with the shows themselves. It’s hard not to think of “Carousel” without recalling his artwork for the 1994 revival that depicts a brooding Billy Bigelow, vividly illuminated from below, atop wooden horses that rear beneath an angry sky.

To commemorate Mr. McMullan’s artistic tenure with Lincoln Center, a permanent exhibition of some of his best-known works was recently installed in the lobby of the Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater. For playwrights, having Mr. McMullan, 82, spend so much time considering and visualizing their created world is like having Picasso paint their child’s portrait. · Go to Poster perfect: The art of James McMullan →

28 07, 2016

Oral history of Tony Kushner’s play Angels in America

Thu, Jul 28, 2016|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Oral history of Tony Kushner’s play Angels in America

From Slate: Twenty-five years ago this summer, Tony Kushner’s Angels in America premiered in the tiny Eureka Theatre in San Francisco’s Mission District. Within two years it had won the Pulitzer Prize and begun a New York run that would dominate the Tony Awards two years in a row, revitalize the nonmusical play on Broadway, and change the way gay lives were represented in pop culture. Both parts of Angels, Millennium Approaches and Perestroika, put gay men at the center of American politics, history, and mythology at a time when they were marginalized by the culture at large and dying in waves. It launched the careers of remarkable actors and directors, not to mention the fiercely ambitious firebrand from Louisiana who wrote it—and rewrote it, and rewrote it, and rewrote it again. Its 2003 HBO adaptation was itself a masterpiece that won more Emmys than Roots. But the play also financially wiped out the theater that premiered it; it endured casting and production tumult at every stage of development, from Los Angeles to London to Broadway; its ambitious, sprawling two-part structure tested the endurance of players, technicians, and audiences. Slate talked to more than 50 actors, directors, playwrights, and critics to tell the story of Angels’ turbulent ascension into the pantheon of great American storytelling—and to discuss the legacy of a play that feels, in an era in which gay Americans have the right to marry but still in many ways live under siege, as crucial as ever. · Go to Oral history of Tony Kushner’s play Angels in America →

9 06, 2016

How “Hamilton” creator Lin-Manuel Miranda is building a brand for the ages

Thu, Jun 9, 2016|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on How “Hamilton” creator Lin-Manuel Miranda is building a brand for the ages

From Fast Company: The history-making Broadway icon recast history to reflect contemporary America, and found innovative ways to put fans first. · Go to How “Hamilton” creator Lin-Manuel Miranda is building a brand for the ages →

5 08, 2012

Dennis Quaid almost became a veterinarian — and other ways in which Cecil Pickett changed the world

Sun, Aug 5, 2012|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , |Comments Off on Dennis Quaid almost became a veterinarian — and other ways in which Cecil Pickett changed the world

From CultureMap Houston: movie and television stars Dennis Quaid, Brett Cullen, Cindy Pickett and Robert Wuhl proved once and for all that a great teacher can have a life-lasting, profound influence on a student. The stars and UH alums were in town for “An Afternoon with the Artists,” a celebration of the life of their former professor, Cecil J. Pickett, which benefited the endowment fund bearing his name. · Go to Dennis Quaid almost became a veterinarian — and other ways in which Cecil Pickett changed the world →

19 03, 2012

Theater, disguised up as real journalism

Mon, Mar 19, 2012|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , |Comments Off on Theater, disguised up as real journalism

From David Carr in NY Times: Is it O.K. to lie on the way to telling a greater truth? Mike Daisey's "The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs" was a fine bit of theater, but it worked less well as journalism, which was how it was represented in January on "This American Life." · Go to Theater, disguised up as real journalism →

Load More Posts