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15 03, 2012

The art of hassle map thinking

Thu, Mar 15, 2012|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , , |Comments Off on The art of hassle map thinking

From ChangeThis: Let’s face it — all too often, life is a succession of hassles. There’s an endless array of frustrations, inconveniences, complications, disappointments, and potential disasters lurking in most of our daily experiences. Even very good products and services (we’ll call them simply “products” for simplicity’s sake) have their weaknesses and drawbacks. My new smartphone sometimes drops my calls; my favorite hotel chain sometimes loses my reservation; those new lightbulbs last longer but produce less light; my new hybrid car gets better mileage but the engine feels less peppy… Managers, marketers, designers, service suppliers, and salespeople for the companies that provide these products don’t focus on their weaknesses. That’s understandable. They devote their lives to making products that are as good as they can possibly be and then to promoting them as enthusiastically as they can. Who wants to concentrate on the negatives? Yet we’ve found that organizations that excel at demand creation do exactly that. They examine the lives of customers through the lens of what we call a Hassle Map — a detailed study of the problems, large and small, that people experience whenever they use their products. · Go to The art of hassle map thinking →

21 11, 2011

Daniel Kahneman in conversation with Richard Layard

Mon, Nov 21, 2011|Filed in: Videos|Topics: , , , , , |Comments Off on Daniel Kahneman in conversation with Richard Layard

From London School of Economics: Two systems drive the way we think and make choices: System One is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System Two is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. Over many years, Daniel Kahneman has conducted groundbreaking research into this – in his own words – "machinery of the mind". Fast thinking has extraordinary capabilities, but also faults and biases. Intuitive impressions have a pervasive influence on our thoughts and our choices. Only by understanding how the two systems work together, Kahneman shows, can we learn the truth about the role of optimism in opening up a new business, and the importance of luck in a successful corporate strategy, or the difficulties of predicting what will make us happy in the future, and the psychological pitfalls of playing the stock market. Kahneman shows where we can trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choice are made in both our business and personal lives – and how we can guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble. This public conversation between Professor Kahneman and Professor Lord Layard celebrates the publication of Kahneman's new book Thinking, Fast and Slow.

21 11, 2011

Training in ‘concrete thinking’ can be self-help treatment for depression, study suggests

Mon, Nov 21, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , |Comments Off on Training in ‘concrete thinking’ can be self-help treatment for depression, study suggests

From Science Daily: New research provides the first evidence that depression can be treated by only targeting an individual's style of thinking through repeated mental exercises in an approach called cognitive bias modification. · Go to Training in ‘concrete thinking’ can be self-help treatment for depression, study suggests →

7 11, 2011

Key learnings from Daniel Kahneman: Thinking, fast and slow

Mon, Nov 7, 2011|Filed in: Books, Paul's blog|Topics: , , , , |Comments Off on Key learnings from Daniel Kahneman: Thinking, fast and slow

From a lecture by Daniel Kahneman, presented by Skeptics Society at CalTech, Sunday, November 6, 2011. In Thinking, fast and slow (2011), Kahneman takes us on a groundbreaking tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think. System 1 is fast, intuitive and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative and more logical.

7 11, 2011

The anti-Gladwell: Kahneman’s new way to think about thinking

Mon, Nov 7, 2011|Filed in: Bookmarks|Topics: , , , , |Comments Off on The anti-Gladwell: Kahneman’s new way to think about thinking

From Maria Popova in The Atlantic: Legendary Israeli-American psychologist Daniel Kahneman is one of the most influential thinkers of our time. A Nobel laureate and founding father of modern behavioral economics, his work has shaped how we think about human error, risk, judgement, decision-making, happiness, and more. For the past half-century, he has profoundly impacted the academy and the C-suite, but it wasn't until this month's highly anticipated release of his "intellectual memoir," Thinking, Fast and Slow, that Kahneman's extraordinary contribution to humanity's cerebral growth reached the mainstream — in the best way possible. · Go to The anti-Gladwell: Kahneman’s new way to think about thinking →

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